Marketing And Sales As Business Processes

In the previous article we spoke about the importance of becoming a trusted brand. In this article we’ll cover how you can begin the process; which entails implementing a process. Below is a schematic diagram of how the various elements of Marketing and Sales fit...
Your marketing aim is to be a trusted advisor

Your marketing aim is to be a trusted advisor

Does the market trust your brand? Do you consider yourself a trusted advisor? These are vital questions to answer honestly.

It is important to know what you need to get done today, what projects you must prioritise and tasks your business needs to tick off. However, you also need a clear understanding of the ultimate objective; the long-term rationale behind what you’re doing.

For me, there is no better focus point than the idea of the Trusted Brand or Trusted Advisor.

How to grow and scale your business

How to grow and scale your business

The following companies announced possible retrenchments in the first 2 weeks of 2020: Dion-Wired – possible 1 400 jobs Telkom – possible 3 000 jobs, Sibanye-Stillwater – possible 1 142 “Many listed companies are set to cut jobs, some predict as many as 10 000 in the...
Making sense of Marketing and Sales

Making sense of Marketing and Sales

Marketing and sales are different – but they work together.

It is crucial to achieve a structure in which the different elements of your business are given the same weight, care and attention.

Now, this sounds straightforward. But business success, strangely, often gets in the way of achieving this structure.

Most people enjoy doing the things that they do well. We’re not that keen, however, on the things that we struggle with, or that have forced us to deal with failure. So, as we go about our business tasks, we all have a strong tendency to follow the things that are working, and that we are enjoying, while quietly forgetting about the other stuff. This is why there are so many businesses with great adverts, but terrible sales processes!

Why I ended up in prison

Why I ended up in prison

Twenty-five years after the end of apartheid, the South African economy is starkly divided between the so-called ‘first’ and ‘second’ economies. This common South African phraseology is a euphemism for ‘the rich’ (who do business in a certain way) and ‘the poor’ (who do business in a different way).

Worryingly, much of the country’s Small & Medium Enterprise (SME) activity is locked into a subsistence paradigm, where each individual business only supports the financial needs of its owner, and fails to contribute meaningfully to economic growth or job creation.